New Participant Roles

Possible Research Topics

 

Add a Song, Make a Movie: Music Supervisors in Film Seek More Recognition

The best music supervisors are sought for their combination of tastemaker, curator, producer, stickler for accuracy and verisimilitude, and they filter out a filmmaker’s worst tendencies. It’s work that falls somewhere between artisan and technician, with the kind of talent-scouting ear associated with A&R executives at record labels. “A music supervisor is set designing the audio,” said Robert Kraft, who was president of Fox Music for 18 years before forming Kraftbox Entertainment in 2012.

www.nytimes.com/…/movies/music-supervisors-in-film-seek-more-recognition.html

 

How to Treat a ‘Money Disorder’

There is a budding field of financial therapy, where budget planning meets psychological counseling. You can even attend a kind of money rehab, where, in six days of group therapy people dig deep into the roots of what psychologists call “money disorders,” the slew of unhealthy and self-destructive behaviors that are not as extreme as pathological gambling, kleptomania or compulsive shopping, but nevertheless afflict large numbers of people.

www.nytimes.com/2008/09/25/health/25iht-25money.16472259.html

 

Zygootic Social Networking

If there’s any truth to the Spanish proverb “an ounce of blood is worth more than a pound of friendship,” then consider the potential of genetic social networking. In October, two companies started social-networking Web sites based not on friendship, business connections or dating desires but on cheek-swab DNA tests. Participants fill out their genetic profile and link up with strangers who share DNA markers. Users can upload baby pictures and home videos, compare family trees and e-mail distant cousins to find out what life is like in the old country.

www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/magazine/09zygotic.html

 

 

To Give Children an Edge, Au Pairs From China

The last two years have seen an astonishing increase in the number of American parents wishing to employ Mandarin-speaking nannies, difficult to find here and even harder to obtain from China.  Their services are in great demand, in part because so many Americans have adopted baby girls from China. Driving the need more aggressively is the desire among ambitious parents to ensure their children’s worldliness, as such parents assume that China’s expanding influence will make Mandarin the sophisticates’ language decades hence.

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/05/us/05aupair.html